Media Center

04-Jun-2019
Collaborator Release

Zymo Research Recognized by NASA for its Support of Research Aboard the International Space Station

DNA/RNA Shield™ Protects Biological Samples Even in Space

25-Oct-2018
Collaborator Release

Rainbow Around The Son Book Chronicles a Mother’s Love and the Mutant p53 Gene

New Bestseller Reveals How One Family Discovered They Carried the Gene with over 90% Chance of Developing Cancer

27-Sep-2018
Press Release

Domoic Acid Decoded: Scientists Discover Genetic Basis for How Harmful Algal Blooms Become Toxic

Research into gene function in microalgae helps determine how toxins are made in oceanic harmful algal blooms

21-Sep-2018
Collaborator Release

NSF announces new awards for Understanding the Rules of Life

New projects address genetic, environmental causality in biological systems and processes

27-Aug-2018
Collaborator Release

Scientists identify a new kind of human brain cell

‘Rosehip’ neurons not found in rodents, may be involved in fine-level control between regions of the human brain

16-Jul-2018
Media Advisory

Research Schooner Tara in San Diego Calls for Innovative Citizen Science and Oceanography 2.0

For in-depth evaluation of ocean health, biodiversity, and evolution

26-Jun-2018
Collaborator Release

S2 Genomics Awarded $280,000 Phase I STTR Grant from the National Institutes of Health

S2 Genomics will develop the Singulator™ system for automated preparation of single cells or nuclei from solid tissue samples

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2010 Internship Program Ready to Go

Are you thinking about summer already? We are!! The 2010 Summer Internship Program is open to accept applications. Last year, we received and reviewed over 300 applications from all over the US and the world for our summer program. Interns were selected to work in most of the research groups...

Scientist Spotlight: Karen Nelson

Karen’s interest in the natural world was sparked at a young age. Born in Jamaica, she enjoyed the outdoors and wonders of nature. Karen was drawn to animals and wanted to become a veterinarian, but after taking some human and animal nutrition courses in college she was hooked on...

Antarctic Epiblog: Leaving McMurdo

Ice formation outside McMurdo Station After we took our samples out at the ice edge, we returned to McMurdo Station for several intense days of demobilization. We had to return all of the large drills, power equipment and camping gear, and spent a considerable time preparing our...

Station IV: The Ice Edge

Our last station in our Ross Sea transect was out at the ice edge, about two miles north of our previous station, Station III. We were interested to see how plankton in the open polynya were different from the phytoplankton we isolated from areas locked in sea-ice. Polynyas are ice-free areas...

Station III: approaching the ice edge

As we were finishing up our work at Station II, we called MacOps, the radio command center for McMurdo Station, and got a 24 hour weather update: a high to the north of Ross Island was blocking a storm in the south, and we were caught in the middle. The prediction: snow, and lots of it. We had...

Station II, Inaccessible Island

The second storm of our trip hit us while we were packing up Station I for a return to McMurdo. The winds began gusting over 50 miles per hour, and the visibility dropped to near zero. We had already packed up camp, but the orders came in over the radio that Condition 1 had been imposed on the...

Kudos to Ken!

JCVI Professor, Kenneth Nealson, has been selected by the American Society of Microbiology to receive an award that recognizes distinguished accomplishments in interdisciplinary research and training in microbiology. The 2010 David C. White Research and Mentoring Award will be awarded to Ken...

McMurdo Sound

It took another day for the storm to blow itself out, but by Tuesday the wind and driving snow had abated, and we drove our Pisten Bully back out to our temporary shelter near Cape Evans. It took several hours of digging to clear the snow away from our vehicles, but once we started driving away...

Scientist Spotlight: Greg Wanger

Greg Wanger was 3.7 km below the Earth’s surface, trapped not only underground but also in a country distant from his native lands of Canada and Liechtenstein. He looked around him. It was very hot and smelled like rotten eggs. As many people do during their graduate careers, Greg pondered...

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17-Jan-2024
Grow by Ginkgo

Getting Under the Skin

Amid an insulin crisis, one project aims to engineer microscopic insulin pumps out of a skin bacterium.

24-Oct-2023
Noema

Planet Microbe

There are more organisms in the sea, a vital producer of oxygen on Earth, than planets and stars in the universe.

29-Aug-2023
Vanity Fair

The Next Climate Change Calamity?: We’re Ruining the Microbiome, According to Human-Genome-Pioneer Craig Venter

In a new book (coauthored with Venter), a Vanity Fair contributor presents the oceanic evidence that human activity is altering the fabric of life on a microscopic scale.

21-Aug-2023
GEN

Lessons from the Minimal Cell

“Despite reducing the sequence space of possible trajectories, we conclude that streamlining does not constrain fitness evolution and diversification of populations over time. Genome minimization may even create opportunities for evolutionary exploitation of essential genes, which are commonly observed to evolve more slowly.”

09-Aug-2023
Quanta Magazine

Even Synthetic Life Forms With a Tiny Genome Can Evolve

By watching “minimal” cells regain the fitness they lost, researchers are testing whether a genome can be too simple to evolve.

15-May-2023
Science

Privacy concerns sparked by human DNA accidentally collected in studies of other species

Two research teams warn that human genomic “bycatch” can reveal private information

10-May-2023
New York Times

Scientists Unveil a More Diverse Human Genome

The “pangenome,” which collated genetic sequences from 47 people of diverse ethnic backgrounds, could greatly expand the reach of personalized medicine.

10-May-2023
Nature

First human ‘pangenome’ aims to catalogue genetic diversity

Researchers release draft results from an ongoing effort to capture the entirety of human genetic variation.

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